Martial Spirit (Martial: Latin martialis, from Mars)

By Ronald Paul Wiskup II

Satgurunath Yogiraj Siddhanath refers to the ego as the anti-Christ which wants to end the Christ within. I know of no more profound truth that necessitates the cultivation and application of spiritual warriorship. Shiva Puranam speaks of the intensity of Lord Shiva’s trance atop Mt. Kailash which caused drops of perspiration (Latin from per- ‘through’ + spirare ‘breathe) to rain upon mother earth, providing birth to the divine child, Bhaum (Mars). Yogiraj has revealed that we can accelerate our spiritual evolution by the factor of intensity. Thus through the precipitation of perseverance, we can kindle the flame of martial spirit within and incinerate the stain of ego.

I find it noteworthy that since meeting Yogiraj and being initiated into Kundalini Kriya Yoga, I have since returned to the practice of martial arts. My first foray into the study of Ninjutsu began as a teenager before I left for military service. Training in the garage and backyard of my buyu (martial friend) as we practiced the ways of the Bujinkan (Hall of the Divine Warrior) and the teachings of Dr. Masaaki Hatsumi sensei, the 34th grandmaster or soke of Bujinkan Budo/Ninpo Taijutsu.

Whilst many in this pursuit find higher precepts through the fighting arts, I first sought the spiritual mysteries and was reminded of its martial roots during a particularly volatile time in my Kriya practice.  This playing out of fate would eventually place my throat beneath the sword and demand of me a commitment. When I had returned home from the Air Force, I re-connected with my friend who was now a 4th Dan rank in the Bujinkan and picked up training a second time. However, this didn’t last. I was soon immersed in myriad worldly diversions and my training faded away. There was no advancement.

Marshalled by the ethereal force of Satgurunath Yogiraj Siddhanath’s poetry, I would eventually come to know him as my master several years later. The sound frequencies he emitted so eloquently resonated within me and awoke my heart. Sealed by my decision to see him in person, the universe conspired for me to attend the 2015 New Life Awakening Retreat in the Catskill Mountains. Since being in his physical presence, I continued to make efforts towards more profound practice sessions. Then, this past December I had an urge to reach out again to my friend in the Bujinkan. As the façade of the outer world began to peel off, I was struggling to maintain any kind of footing in everyday life. Next thing I know, I was flat on my back against the dojo asana with a cold metal sword protruding into my neck. Ah, it was nice to see my buyu again! The message of the warrior ancestors was clear “Are you ready to take it seriously this time?”

Extreme fluctuations in my personal Kriya practice had caused me to endure periods of doubt, delays in practicing and my own ignorance induced traumas. Bruised but not beaten by the incessant sway of ego induced suffering, I understood that I must heal myself with the fixed practice of Kriya Yog and come to know my immovable spirit. Yogiraj’s words hearkened, “Practice and perseverance are the magic of success, and unless you fall in love with your practice you will not know its value.”

The synchronistic timing of my experiences has brought this lesson to light. The essence of Yogiraj’s wisdom and the philosophy of Ninpō are distilled to the same elixir for success. As our master has spoken: “You can never meet God. How can you him? You don’t know his whereabouts, you don’t know his address. But God is going to meet you. He is in search of you constantly, and when you are ready he will meet you. Practice will make you ready. Perseverance will make you perfect. So carry these two mantras with you: Practice and Perseverance. Let these two be the goals. Let your whole life revolve around them, and very soon you will be empty. Then God will pour into you.”

These paramount amalgamations so too reverberate within the halls of the Bujin. Hatsumi sensei tells in his book The Way of the Ninja, “I could hear Sensei’s (Toshitsugu Takamatsu) words still echoing in my ears— The true essence of the martial ways lies in virtue, Martial arts are a path for perfecting yourself as a human being. Perfection demands persistence, and there is also a secret teaching in which perfection is mentioned with reference to seven lights, i.e. — the colors of a rainbow.” How fascinating when we consider the goals Yogiraj has transmitted and knowing that he has also made reference to Divya deha, an immaculate body of rainbow colored light free from the ravages of time, for uninterrupted communion with God.

Yogiraj belabors the vital-ness of both Hatha and Raja (Royal) Yog and in Wings to Freedom he resounds: “To neglect the needs of bodily health is to falsify the eternal doctrine of the unity of all and the divinity of all.” During times of agitation when I am unable to sit for meditation, the physical aspect of martial arts training has helped me balance hormonal and psychic energies. Hence, the twin flames of practice and perseverance intertwine along axis of Kriya Yog both in meditation and daily activity, heaving us up through the heavens.

The day after I began writing this essay for the Siddhanath Newsletter, my sensei awarded me the beginner rank of Green Belt in Bujinkan Budo/Ninpo Taijutsu. During this same session the mechanisms of Karma blessed me with a blackened eye. I was happy to have this mitigated and memorable experience, teaching me to always pay attention! In Japan, the word Ninja is written as Shinobi no Mono. This symbolic ideogram consists of kanji (characters) depicting a sword held over the heart. The word Nin is translated as endurance or perseverance. A quote from Masaaki Hatsumi sensei informs (Latin informare: shape in- ‘into’ + forma ‘a form) those of us engaged in Budo to “Breathe life into the weapon, don’t take life away from it. Keep walking, because walking is life.” With the Hamsa breath, given by Yogiraj, over time I begin breathing less and less of me and more and more God. There’s also something about bearing a stainless steel sword over my heart that cures all depression and connects me with source!

Yogiraj directs us to be the architect of our own happiness through the secret science of breath. Thus, as we clash within the mental coliseum of delusion, illusion and error; let us draw forth Shinmyo Ken, the sword of divine mystery. With the sword of concentrated breath, eviscerate the dis-ease of samsara (repetitive history) and shine in the victorious light of the unconquerable soul.

Ronald Paul Wiskup II was born with the Sun in Aries and is the author of  “The Face on Mars is in the Mirror”, an original collection of occult poetry. He enjoys aviation, acting, playing ice hockey and scuba diving. He is a veteran of the United States Air Force and holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from the State University of New York at Fredonia.

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